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Ian Wilson
Ian Wilson

Welcome Matures



Gamers and non-gamers alike, get ready to welcome your guests with a new twist on an old classic. Product designer Drought has created a doormat that is sure to bring a smile to the faces of all who cross its threshold.Credit: DroughtOn Friday March 24th, Drought will release their latest creation on their website: a doormat that looks just like the rating labels found on video games. But instead of an "M" for "Mature," this label features an upside-down "M" which is of course a "W" for "Welcome." How clever!Credit: DroughtWhile more details will be available when the product is released, we do know that this funny doormat will warn guests of some graphic content they may encounter in the home they're about to enter. Instead of violence and gore, however, these warnings include "Strong Language," "Use of Alcohol," "Partial Nudity," and "Mature Humor."Credit: Drought So, if your guests are easily offended, they may want to think twice before entering your abode!Credit: DroughtThis doormat is not only hilarious, but it's also a perfect gift for video game lovers who own their own home or for placing in front of the bedroom of someone who loves playing video games. And let's be honest, who wouldn't want to be greeted by a "mature" rating label when entering their home?Credit: DroughtSo mark your calendars for March 24th and head over to Drought's website to snag one of these funny doormats for yourself or your gamer friends. It's sure to be a hit and will add a touch of humor to any home, especially one with gamers!Credit: DroughtDrought has mentioned on their Twitter that they plan on selling the funny gamer doormat on their website for $69 bucks!




welcome matures



The University of Law welcomes mature students, offering a variety of different study modes: full-time, part-time, attendance and online. Around 15% of our full-time undergraduate population are mature students. We have campuses across the country as well as online courses so you do not need to move away from home to be able to study with us. We have a large number of mature students on our online courses as they find this mode of study more suited to balancing their studies with their other commitments: over half of our online undergraduate students are mature.


We welcome mature applicants with all qualifications and consider applications holistically, taking into account professional and life experience. For more information on our entry requirements and details of which courses have a non-standard entry route, please see our Undergraduate and Postgraduate entry requirements pages or contact our Admissions team.


Whether you are an undergraduate, a postgraduate, or on an access course, as long as you were 21+ at the start of your course you are welcome to join the Mature Students Association (MSA). We are exclusively run by UofG mature students, for UofG mature students.


We welcome mature applicants and can assist you during your the application process and throughout your time as a UCD student. Don't worry that you will be the only mature student - we admit hundreds of mature students each year and there is an active mature students society.


The role of welfare mentors it to further support mentor wellbeing, you will be there during welcome to assist with welfare logs, following up the welfare of the mentors after any welfare events, be a point of contact for lead mentors, if they have any concerns about their mentors. Escalate any concerns to the Welcome Committee or Student Union staff. You will be approachable, share your knowledge, champion positive mental health wellbeing and foster an inclusive group culture.


Mature students - we would like to offer you a warm welcome back to Term Two. Come along and join us and our mature Student Mentors for a free snack and hot drink. We'd love to meet you, and it's a great opportunity for you to connect, or reconnect, with fellow mature students from across NTU.


Here at Christ's, we welcome applications from those who will be 21 or over at the start of your course. Although it may come as a surprise to know that we call you 'mature' from 21, there are some details for mature applicants that are a worth setting out, so we hope that you will find this separate page useful to read alongside the rest of our undergraduate admissions section.


One thing you'll see is that as a mature applicant you can choose between applying to one of the three colleges for mature applicants only, or applying to any of the 'standard-age' colleges such as Christ's. This is very much your choice, and if you like Christ's, we hope that you will feel confident to consider an application to us as a mature student. Of course, we're often asked what the difference is, really, between applying to Christ's and applying to a mature College. In the table below, we've done our best to give you a fair summary. You'll see that as they are designed for mature applicants, the mature colleges can organise one or two things differently to make it a bit easier for some circumstances, however if you've had a look at the information for Christ's below and are able to make it work, we would welcome your application to Christ's.


If you'd like to visit Christ's, you are welcome to come to an open day if you'd like to. Elsewhere on this website we often write in terms of school years, but mature students who are interested in an application are also welcome to request a place at the Christ's open days and taster days advertised for Year 12 students.


Whatever your reason for returning to education, whether it is to upskill or gain a new qualification or perhaps you are embarking on a new career choice or are committed to achieving a new personal goal or ambition, we are here to help. We are delighted warmly welcome all mature students to our learning community.


Mature students may think their chances of acceptance at universities are lower than fresh high school graduates, but most universities actually welcome mature students for their contributions to the classroom. A large number of students are actually considered mature students in Ontario, being over 21 years of age at the time of their studies.


All of our courses are open to mature students. At Goldsmiths we welcome students of all ages because we understand the importance of real-life experience and the insights that older people bring with them.


Graduate and mature applicants are welcome to send a supporting second reference, quoting their UCAS number, to the Admissions Office by 15th October deadline. This gives you the opportunity to provide information that you are unable to fit on your UCAS application. An application will not be disadvantaged if this information is not submitted. Please make sure that the reference is on letterheaded paper and is signed. Alternatively, the reference can be sent directly from the referee's email address, providing it is not their personal account.


Contrary to other maturity models, we do not define staged partial compliance levels. A mature Apache project complies with all the elements of this model, and other projects are welcome to adopt the elements that suit their goals.


We welcome mature students to our courses and value the experience they bring. Around 60 per cent of our students are classed as mature - that is, they were aged 21 or over when they started their courses.


Whatever the reasons, you'll find a welcome environment at Birmingham City University. The large number of mature students here means that there'll be plenty of fellow students who are also getting to grips with the challenges and rewards of returning to education.


Mature students make up approximately 10% of the total undergraduate population at Queen's, representing a diverse student group. We recognise and value the wide range of knowledge, experience and skills you bring to the university community. Queen's University uses the HESA definition of mature students with undergraduates classed as "mature if they are 21 or over." We particularly encourage applications from mature students, and we welcome on average approximately 800 new students every year. We understand the concerns that you may have as new students, so we have put together the following pages to help address these. Whether you are a prospective student or a current student at Queen's, we hope that you will find the information you are looking for.


The welcome swallow was first described by John Gould in The Birds of Australia[4] as a member of the genus Hirundo, but the first publication is often incorrectly given as in the Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London.[5][6] Both its species name and common name refer to people welcoming its return as a herald of spring in southern parts of Australia.[5]


Welcome swallows have a very large distributional range because they are a cross-regional species.[7] Welcome swallows live mostly in eastern, western, southern and central Australia. The welcome swallows that live in eastern Australia move to northern Australia in winter. The welcome swallows that live in Western Australia and others that live in New Zealand are mostly not migratory.[11] This swallow species has been observed nesting in the majority of New Zealand and its surrounding islands, Australia and some parts of Tasmania.[12] Currently, this species has been recorded in New Guinea, New Caledonia and other surrounding islands. The distribution of the welcome swallow also depends on seasonal change. During the winter, the welcome swallow in Australia will move towards the north which places it closer to the equator and warm weather. For the following spring, they will return to southern Australia to breed.[11]


The welcome swallow is a self-introduced species from Australia that is believed to have flown over to New Zealand in the early 1900s.[7] The welcome swallow is found throughout most parts of New Zealand, but it is very rare in Fiordland.[7] The shape of New Zealand is narrow and long, which helped the birds to easily get to areas near water. They are also on Chatham and Kermadec Islands and in some instances have been seen on Campbell Island, Auckland Island and the Snares.[7] 041b061a72


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